Alexandria’s ”Graeco-Roman Museum” Set to Reopen After Years of Renovation

The Greek inscription ”ΜΟΥΣΕΙΟΝ” on the facade of the building. Photo by iefimerida

The ”Graeco-Roman Museum” of Alexandria, Egypt is due to reopen in the following months, after years of expensive restorative work and renovations.

The museum, which was established in 1892, contains thousands of beautiful and priceless artifacts dating back to the Graeco-Roman and Ptolemaic era of the third century BC.

Its collections offer an important glimpse into the Greco-Roman civilization which shaped the face of Egypt more than 2000 years ago.

According to reports in Egyptian newspapers, the renovation is expected to finish over the next months, and certainly before the end of 2019.

The facade of the museum is designed after an ancient Greek temple and its main sign is in Greek.

The inscription emblazoned on the lintel spells out ”ΜΟΥΣΕΙΟN”, meaning ”museum.”

The museum was transferred to its current position near the famous Gamal Abdul Nasser Street in 1895. It has been closed for repairs and renovation since the year 2005.

The restoration has taken more than fourteen years, mainly due to the lack of funds to complete the work.