Achaeological Artifacts Found in Machu Picchu Similar to Greek Relics

A team of Peruvian archaeologists from the National Institute of Culture have unearthed three newly found ceremonial offerings in an area known as “cemetery”, in Machu Picchu, consisting of three conical jugs. These ceremonial offerings are from Incan times.

INC archaeologist Ruben Maqque said to El Comercio that the findings include three ceramics or miniature aryballos with globular body and covered with stone slabs forming a circle, known as “apachetas.”
The three aryballos found; a common pottery shape consisting of a long-necked pitcher with a conical base, traditionally called macka o puyñun that were used as ceremonial jars. The name of this style of ceramics Aryballos, comes from the Greeks that created similar pottery in the 9th century.

Also nine kinds of stone brought by the ancient pilgrims from different parts of the neighboring region were found at this site. The work by the group of Peruvian archaeologists began in 2007 and is focused on an excavation near the so-called Mirador, or Lookout Point, visited by hundreds of tourists every day, Maqque said.

He added that the budget for excavation and conservation works in Machu Picchu this year is around 350,000 sols (somewhat more than $100,000).


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  • Sylvia Buttershnof

    This really doesn’t help.